SE Labs

Posts tagged 'cybersecurity'

SE Labs Annual Report 2020

awards winners testing like hackers

Well, 2020 was an interesting year! Some of the largest and newest security companies were bought and sold…

The world descended into chaos thanks to a biological virus (while digital viruses continue to wreak havoc)…

And SE Labs launched a new website and started using machine learning in its testing.

We appreciate some of these things are more important than others…

However, in the face of adversity we must all carry on and we are proud to announce our second annual report, in which we review the unprecedented year of 2020, announce our annual awards winners and discuss testing like hackers.

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Next-gen testing for next-gen security products

Next-gen testing for next-gen products

Bad guys help SE Labs keep its testing up to date

Latest endpoint protection reports now online for enterprise, small business and home users.

For the first time in our endpoint protection tests we’ve seen a strong overall performance from both well-established anti-malware brands and newer entrants to the market.

Vendors such as FireEye and Crowdstrike are well-known and respected brands in the security world, but they are relatively new compared to Symantec, McAfee and even Microsoft. Microsoft has not promoted its anti-malware software until quite recently.

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SE Labs launches new security testing site

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The new website reflects the changes in the security industry over the last few years. We’ve listened hard to your feedback and watched as the industry’s needs have changed.

Clients, both security vendors and their customers, need increasingly customised analysis of products and their effectiveness. Which is the best? And what does ‘best’ really mean?

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Strong protection in uncertain times

A hacker mentality is keeping (computer) virus testing on track.

Latest endpoint protection reports now online for enterprisesmall business and home users.

This is the first in our series of 2020 endpoint protection reports. And it is unique, for all the usual reasons but also a new one.

We would normally highlight the latest new threats that we’ve discovered on the internet and discuss how we test them against the security software you use in your business and at home in the most realistic ways possible. And we’ve done that. But these reports are different to any we’ve produced before, for another reason.

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Testing deeper, wider and better

Bad guys evolve; defenders evolve; testing (should) evolve

Latest endpoint protection reports now online for enterprise, small business and home users.

These reports represent the state-of-the-art in computer security endpoint testing. If you want to see how the very best security products handle a range of threats, from everyday (but nevertheless very harmful) malware to targeted attacks, this is a great place to start.

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Securing a business from scratch

Building and launching a start-up company is a challenge in itself. Securing it when it is new, young and vulnerable is something else. It’s very necessary but also hard if you don’t know what you’re doing. And can you afford a consultant in the early days?

If your new business is IT-based and focused on security then you’re in a stronger position than, say, an organic make-up business or an ethical coffee brand.

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SE Labs introducing cyber security to schools

It’s widely acknowledged that the cyber security workforce needs more talented young people to engage. Just as we, at SE Labs, want to help fix information technology security by testing products and services, we also want to encourage an interest among young people, hopefully igniting a passion for understanding and defending against hacking attacks.

We test next-gen security products AND encourage the gen-next!

Our attempts to enable youth from progressing from complete novice, through to getting their first job and then to reaching the top of industry, is an initiative to bring about the needed change and fill the gaps.

As part of our new corporate social responsibility programme we set up an event at Carshalton Boys Sports College to introduce the concept of cyber security and its career prospects to the students.

Around 15 participants ranged from year 10s to sixth formers (aged 16-18) attended the main presentation and all year groups approached us at the stand we set up.

We outlined various topics in the presentation including the different types of cybercrime and attacks; and institutions offering free and paid courses to certain age groups on cyber security, aimed at students.

We also addressed how to break into the cyber security sector; what positions are available in the industry; and how employees are in high demand in both public and private sectors, part- and full-time, in virtually every industry in countries around the world.

Then we went through a test run of a targeted attack to demonstrate what it looks like and what it means.

“Why do we use Kali Linux?”, “What should I do to get into cyber security?”, “What are the skills required?”, were a few curious questions asked by the students at the end of the presentation.

Those who came over to the stand wanted to know who we were, what we do and simply, “what is cyber security?”

They were interested in who are clients are (we gave limited answers due to NDAs), what do they need us and how did we manage to get this far. A lot of these were asked by the younger years who were inquisitive to learn more about this subject. Positive!

Feedback from the college:

On behalf of the Governors, Head Principle, students and parents of Carshalton Boys Sports College, I would like to thank you for your valued input, helping to make our Directions and Destinations Day a great success. 

Our staff work tirelessly to open our students’ minds to the possibilities available to them, but without the support of partners like you, that job would be impossible. Together we had the school filled with a sense of purpose all day and responses we have had from students and parents have shown us that the day has inspired our students. 

We have already started thinking about the future and would be grateful if you have any suggestions about how we might make things even better next year. 

Thank you once again for giving your time, energy and expertise last week.

Well, yes! A career in cyber security is a journey for sure, but a worthwhile one. And in the end, it’s more about people than machines, as a mind’s software can be more powerful than any hardware.

Pooja Jain, March 2018

Anatomy of a Phishing Attack

phishing_magnifying_glass_fi-3673555Who attacked a couple of Internet pressure groups earlier this year? Jon Thompson examines the evidence.

For those on those of us engaged in constructing carefully-crafted tests against client email filtering services, the public details of an unusually high-quality spear-phishing attack against a low value target make for interesting reading.

In this case, there were two targets: Free Press, and Fight for the Future. The attack, dubbed “Phish for the Future” in a brief analysis by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, is curious for several reasons.

Free Press is a pressure group campaigning for an open internet, fighting media consolidation by large corporations, and defending press freedom. Fight for the Future works to protect people’s basic online freedoms. Objectively, they’re working for a better online future, which makes the whole affair stand out like a pork buffet at a bar mitzvah.

The first thing that struck me was that the emails were apparently all sent during office hours. The time zones place the senders anywhere between Finland and India, but apparently resolve to office hours when normalised to a single zone.

Another interesting aspect is that even though the emails were sent on 23 active days, the attackers didn’t work weekends. This immediately marks them out as unusual. Anyone who’s run an email honeypot knows that commodity spam flows 24 hours a day.

The attackers first tried generic phishing expeditions, but quickly cranked up their targeting and psychological manipulation. This begs an interesting question: If you’re an experienced, professional, disciplined crew, why jeopardise the operation by beginning with less convincing samples that may alert the target to be on the lookout? Why didn’t they simply start with the good stuff, get the job done, and move on?

One possible explanation is that the attackers were trainees on a course, authorised to undertake a carefully controlled “live fire” exercise. Psychologically manipulative techniques such as pretending to be a target’s husband sending family photos, or a fan checking a URL to someone’s music, imply a level of confident duplicity normally associated with spying scandals.

The level of sophistication and persistence on display forms a shibboleth. It looks and smells somehow “wrong”. The published report reveals an attention to detail and target reconnaissance usually reserved for high value commercial targets. Either the attackers learn at a tremendous rate
through sheer interest alone, or they’re methodically being taught increasingly sophisticated techniques to a timetable. If it was part of a course, then maybe the times the emails were sent show a break for morning coffee, lunch and afternoon tea, or fall into patterns of tuition followed by practical exercises.

phishing2b-6448783The timing of the complete attack also stands out. It began on 7th July, ended on 8th August, and straddled the Net Neutrality Day of Action (12th July). With a lot happening at both targets during that time, and one assumes a lot of email flying about, perhaps the attackers believed they stood a better chance when the staff were busiest.

So, to recap, it looks like highly motivated yet disciplined attackers were operating with uncommonly sophisticated confidence against two small online freedom groups. Neither target has the business acumen of a large corporation, which rules out criminal gain, and yet an awful lot of effort was ranged against them.

The product of phishing is access, either to abuse directly or to be sold to others. Who would want secret access to organisations campaigning for online freedom? Both targets exist to change minds and therefore policy, which makes them political. They’re interesting not only to governments, but also to media companies seeking to control the internet.

I’m speculating wildly, of course. The whole thing could very easily have been perpetrated by an under-worked individual at a large company, using their office computer and keeping regular hours to avoid suspicion. The rest is down to ingenuity and personal motivation.

We’ll never know the truth, but the supporting infrastructure detailed in the EFF report certainly points to some considerable effort over a long period of time. If it was an individual, he’s out there, he’ll strike again, and he learns fast. In many ways, I’d prefer it to have been a security service training new recruits.

Review: ImmuniWeb On-Demand Application Security Testing

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What do a start-up, small business and enterprise have in common?

They all have one or more websites.

That’s not a very humorous punchline, but the security implications of managing business websites aren’t funny either.

In an age when extremely large organisations are being hacked, as well as specialist security companies, website security could not be a more serious business. Throw into the mix regulations such as the data protection act and the incoming GDPR legislation and being the person responsible for the company website just became positively horrible.

A website is a business’ public face, whether it be a local taxi company or a global pharmaceutical giant. It is virtually impossible to do business these days without a website and maintain credibility, but a website hack instantly harms any company’s standing.

How do websites get hacked? Sometimes the attackers will focus on compromising the site’s administrator, but more often than not (in our experience) the site itself is attacked directly by means of an exploit.

Such an exploit could be a aimed at a vulnerability in the platform, such as WordPress, or the server’s operating system. Sometimes the hosting company itself is targeted: a good value-for-money proposition for an attacker who wants to run one attack and gain access to thousands of websites.

Will AI save our sites?
Artificial intelligence is great but people are often necessary for some tasks. ImmuniWeb understands that. Assessing the security of a website is non-trivial and, while automated tools exist to test for the presence of various vulnerabilities, often it takes a human brain to really get to the bottom of a problem. Much in the same way that SE Labs uses people to enhance security testing, ImmuniWeb adds the personal touch to checking the quality of a website’s security.
The service provides testing for vulnerabilities listed in the OWASP Top Ten Vulnerabilities list, PCI DSS vulnerabilities and a range of other sensible criteria, including predictable CAPTCHA protections and open directory listings.
Wizard setup
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Setting up the initial test was a very simple task. Enter a few relevant details into  ImmuniWeb’s Wizard-driven website, pay the fee and the work starts. A couple of days later a report is made available and you have around three months to download it before it is deleted automatically. You will receive warnings about the impending deletion.
The report is detailed. The first pages give an overview of the risk level based on how many vulnerabilities have been found, certain administration configuration issues that might exist and even an indication of other websites that might be impersonating yours.
Who is hosting?
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The data in the reports is interesting and some of the issues brought to light could be easily solved. It does depend on how you have your web hosting organised, though. For example, if you run your own servers you can follow advice on upgrading certain services, such as Apache or SSH.
However, if your site runs on a hosting platform provided by a third-party, such as GoDaddy, 1&1, 123Reg or a thousand others then you have a choice: You could contact the company and request that they upgrade; or move to another host and hope that they do a better job with updates.
In this review we discovered that the hosting company we use for the SE Labs website was a little behind with some updates. We used the ImmuniWeb report as evidence that there was a potential problem and, to our surprise, the company responded fast and claimed to fix the issues.
While we could verify the changes ourselves (after all, we test security systems ourselves) we understand that for most businesses a second test would be warranted. We ran a second test for this review and were pleased to see that the previous issues had indeed been fixed.
How much?
This is where things could get expensive, though. An on-demand small business (SMB) test costs $1,499. If you are a start-up and want to have your site assessed then this is a reasonable business expense. Multiple verification tests add up, though. A faster ‘Express’ test is less expensive, coming in at $499. If you expect your site to change frequently then continuous assessments are available, with prices starting at $999 per month.
Total Cost of Reassurance
But while your site might not change, knowledge about security vulnerabilities does. New vulnerabilities are being discovered at a frightening rate and updates for popular web server components, such as MySQL, appear often. When testing our own website ImmuniWeb noted out of date software, which was updated accordingly.
By the time we ran the second test the same, updated software was again out of date. If the same issues happen to you, it might be worth learning how to test the versions of the services running at your web hosting company and give them a prod to update as and when necessary. Paying over $1,000 to assess something they should be taking care of seems unnecessary.
Monitoring the weak link
Losing control of your website is a situation no business wants to contemplate, whether it’s a start-up looking for funding or a massively profitable public company. Web application vulnerabilities are a significant weak point that can and should be assessed regularly. ImmuniWeb provides just such a service but because people are involved, as well as machine learning-equipped systems, there is a significant cost to the system, as well as an advantage over free website scanning sites and tools.
While, on the face of it, using ImmuniWeb’s service might appear expensive, compared to training your own team of penetration testers, or sub-contracting a company to do the work for you, it is good value for money.

The Government Encryption Enigma

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Is Amber Rudd right about encryption? Jon Thompson isn’t so sure.

UK Home Secretary Amber Rudd recently claimed in an article that “real people” prefer ease of use to unbreakable security when online. She was met immediately by outrage from industry pundits, but does she have a point?

Though paywalled, as reported elsewhere, Rudd asks in her article, “Who uses WhatsApp because it is end-to-end encrypted, rather than because it is an incredibly user-friendly and cheap way of staying in touch with friends and family?”

Rudd name-checked Khalid Masood, who used WhatsApp minutes before he drove a van into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge killing three, and then fatally stabbed a police officer outside Parliament before being shot dead. However, Masood was not part of any MI5 investigation. In fact, a week after the attack, police had to appeal for information about him. His final WhatsApp message seems to have been the first sign that he was about to strike. The recipient was entirely innocent, and knew nothing of his murderous intentions.

There are plenty of other atrocities that were planned in part via social media apps. The attacks on Paris in December 2015, and the Stockholm lorry attack to name but two. In the UK the new UK Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA), which caused so much fuss last year, can compel vendors to decrypt. So, why not just use that? The answer is somewhat complicated.

The IPA makes provision for Communications Service Providers to be served with a notice that they must remove encryption from messages to assist in the execution of an interception warrant. Apart from Providers needing access to private decryption keys, reports suggest that any move to enforce this measure would meet stiff opposition, and may not even be enforceable.

Many of the most popular secure messaging apps use the Signal Protocol, developed by Open Whisper Systems. This is a non-profit organisation and lies outside the UK’s jurisdiction, so its compliance would be difficult to obtain, even if the companies using the protocol agreed to re-engineer their platforms to include backdoors, or to lower encryption standards. There are also plenty of other issues to be resolved if Rudd is to get her way.

If the government mandates weaker encryption for messaging apps in the UK, then companies will face difficult business choices and technological challenges. It boils down to a choice: they could weaken their encryption globally, or they could just weaken encryption in the UK. But what happens
if you send a secure message from outside the UK to someone inside the country? Can the UK authorities read it? Can the recipient, using a lower encryption standard, decrypt it? How would international business communications work if the UK office doesn’t use the same encryption standard as a foreign parent company?

This isn’t the first time the UK government has attempted to find an answer to the problem of encryption. Back in January 2015, the then-Prime Minister David Cameron gave a speech in which he said there should be no means of communication “which we cannot read”. He was roundly criticised as “technologically illiterate” by opposition parties, and later clarified his views, saying he didn’t want to ban encryption, just have the ability to read anyone’s encrypted communications.

amber2brudd-2638730Authoritative voices have since waded into the argument. Lord Evans, the former head of MI5, has recently spoken out about the problems posed by strong encryption: “It’s very important that we should be seen and be a country in which people can operate securely – that’s important for our commercial interests as well as our security interests, so encryption in that context is very positive.”

Besides, if the government can decrypt all messages in the UK, won’t genuine terrorists simply set up their own “dark” services? Ten seconds on Google Search shows plenty of open source, secure chat packages they could use. If such groups are as technologically advanced as we’re led to believe, then it should be simple for them, and terrifying for the rest of us. Wouldn’t it be better to keep such groups using mainstream apps and quietly develop better tools for tracking them via their metadata?

Rudd’s argument that “real people” want ease of use over strong encryption implies that secure apps are in some way difficult to set up and require effort to maintain. The opposite is plainly true, as anyone who’s ever ‘butt dialled’ with their mobile phone can tell you.

Rudd’s argument also plays into the idea that if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear. While writing this piece, I accessed several dozen online information sources, from mainstream news reports of terrorist outrages to super paranoid guides for setting up secure chat services. I accessed many of these sources multiple times. I didn’t access any extremist material, but my browsing history shows a clear and persistent interest in recent atrocities perpetrated on UK soil, secure chat methods, MI5 and GCHQ surveillance methods, encryption algorithms, and so on. Joining the dots to arrive at the wrong conclusion would be a grave mistake, and yet without the wider context of this blog piece to explain myself, how would authorities know I’m not planning to be the next Khalid Masood or Darren Osborne? The answer lies in developing better tools that gather more context than just what apps you use.

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SE Labs Ltd is a private, independently-owned and run testing company that assesses security products and services. The main laboratory is located in Wimbledon, South London. It has excellent local and international travel connections. The lab is open for prearranged client visits.

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