SE Labs

Posts filed under 'hacking'

Strong protection in uncertain times

A hacker mentality is keeping (computer) virus testing on track.

Latest endpoint protection reports now online for enterprisesmall business and home users.

This is the first in our series of 2020 endpoint protection reports. And it is unique, for all the usual reasons but also a new one.

We would normally highlight the latest new threats that we’ve discovered on the internet and discuss how we test them against the security software you use in your business and at home in the most realistic ways possible. And we’ve done that. But these reports are different to any we’ve produced before, for another reason.

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Email security: Is it any good against hackers?

World’s first in-depth, public test of security services vs. targeted attacks.

This email security test report is the product of two years of advanced threat research. We have worked with the security companies themselves and with their customers.  We have monitored what the bad guys have been doing and identified and replicated real-world email threats that affect everyone generally, and also specific types of businesses.

There is no report like this anywhere in the public domain. We are extremely proud to present the results here.

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Breach Response Test: Kaspersky Anti Targeted Attack Platform

Testing anti-breach products needs the full chain of attack.

Kaspersky Lab should be congratulated, not only for engaging with this new and challenging test, but for submitting a product that performed so strongly against attacks that closely replicate advanced, nation-state level threats.

Its endpoint detection and response offering, Kaspersky Anti Targeted Attack Platform, is one of the very first to face our brand new Breach Response Test and it detected all of the attacks, while protecting against the vast majority of them.

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Breach Response Test: Symantec Endpoint Security Complete

Testing anti-breach products needs the full chain of attack.

Symantec’s endpoint detection and response offering, Symantec Endpoint Security Complete, is the first to face our brand new Breach Response Test.

Report now online.

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SE Labs Annual Report 2019

SE Labs has been working at the core of the cyber security industry since its launch in 2016. We work with all of the major developers of IT security products as well as their main customers and even investors looking to increase their chances when betting on emerging technologies.

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Targeted attacks with public tools

Over the last few years we have tested more than 50 different products using over 5,000 targeted attacks. And there’s news, both good and bad.

In this article we will look at the different tools available, how effective they are at helping attackers bypass anti-malware products and how security vendors have been handling this type of threat for over a year.

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Assessing next-generation protection

Malware scanning is not enough. You have to hack, too.

Latest report now online.
The amount of choice when trialling or buying endpoint security is at an all-time high. It has been 36 years since ‘anti-virus’ first appeared and, in the last five years, the number of companies innovating and selling products designed to keep Windows systems secure has exploded.
And whereas once vendors of these products generally used non-technical terms to market their wares, now computer science has come to the fore. No longer are we offered ‘anti-virus’ or ‘hacker protection’ but artificial intelligence-based detection and response solutions. The choice has never been greater, nor has the confusion among potential customers.
While marketing departments appear to have no doubt about the effectiveness of their product, the fact is that without in-depth testing no-one really knows whether or not an Endpoint Detection and Response (EDR) agent can do what it is intended.

Internal testing is necessary but inherently biased: ‘we test against what we know’. Thorough testing, including the full attack chains presented by threats, is needed to show not only detection and protection rates, but response capabilities.

EventTracker asked SE Labs to conduct an independent test of its EDR agent, running the same tests as are used against some of the world’s most established endpoint security solutions available, as well as some of the newer ones.
This report shows EventTracker’s performance in this test. The results are directly comparable with the public SE Labs Enterprise Endpoint Protection (Oct – Dec 2018) report, available here.

How well do email security gateways protect against targeted attacks?

Email security test explores how and when services detect and stop threats.

Latest report now online.

This new email protection test shows a wide variation in the abilities of the services that we have assessed.

You might see the figures as being disappointing. Surely Microsoft Office 365 can’t be that bad? An eight per cent accuracy rating seems incredible.

Literally not credible. If it misses most threats then organisations relying on it for email security would be hacked to death (not literally).

But our results are subtler than just reflecting detection rates and it’s worth understanding exactly what we’re testing here to get the most value from the data. We’re not testing these services with live streams of real emails, in which massive percentages of messages are legitimate or basic spam. Depending on who you talk to, around 50 per cent of all email is spam. We don’t test anti-spam at all, in fact, but just the small percentage of email that comprises targeted attacks.

In other words, these results show what can happen when attackers apply themselves to specific targets. They do not reflect a “day in the life” of an average user’s email inbox.

We have also included some ‘commodity’ email threats, though – the kind of generic phishing and social engineering attacks that affect everyone. All services ought to stop every one of these. Similarly, we included some clean emails to ensure that the services were not too aggressively configured. All services ought to allow all these through to the inbox.

So when you see results that appear to be surprising, remember that we’re testing some very specific types of attacks that happen in real life, but not in vast numbers comparable to spam or more general threats.

The way that services handle threats are varied and effective to greater or lesser degrees. To best reflect how useful their responses are, we have a rating system that accounts for their different approaches. Essentially, services that keep threats as far as possible from users will win more points than those who let the message appear in or near the inbox. Conversely, those that allow the most legitimate messages through to the inbox rate higher than those which block them without the possibility of recovery from a junk folder or quarantine.

If you spot a detail in this report that you don’t understand, or would like to discuss, please contact us via our Twitter or Facebook accounts.

SE Labs uses current threat intelligence to make our tests as realistic as possible. To learn more about how we test, how we define ‘threat intelligence’ and how we use it to improve our tests please visit our website and follow us on Twitter.
Our latest reports, for enterprisesmall business and home users are now available for free from our website. Please download them and follow us on Twitter and/or Facebook to receive updates and future reports.

Network security appliances vs. Word and PowerShell

Over the last few months we have seen a surge in attacks using apparently innocent documents that install malware covertly on victims’ systems.

Unless you are running specialist monitoring tools, or very effective security software, you probably won’t see any symptoms of the attack.

The goals of these attacks are varied. In some cases they provide remote access to hackers. In others so-called cryptocurrency mining software is installed. These programs (ab)use your systems’ processing power in an attempt to generate cryptocurrencies such as Monero. The attackers get rich off your power bill.

While there are variations in how the attacks work, the typical path to compromise involves opening the document, which could be in Microsoft Word format, after which an exploit runs a PowerShell script. This, in turn, downloads and installs the malware.

In this report we investigate how effectively some very popular network security products are at handling these and other threats.

As usual, we have also thrown in some particularly devious targeted attacks that appear to be completely legitimate applications but that provide us with remote access to unprotected targets. When we gain this access we try to hack the target in the same way a real attacker would. This gives the security products the best chance of detecting and potentially blocking the bad behaviour.

The good news is that all of these products were able to detect many (if not all) of the threats. Some were able to block most, although complete protection is not guaranteed. As always, a layered approach to protection is best. For advice on which endpoint software to choose see our Endpoint Protection test results on our website.

Latest report (PDF) now online.

What’s the difference between SE Labs and a cyber-criminal?

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As we prepared this network security appliance report for publication we were also getting ready to present at BT’s internal security conference Snoopcon.

We had been asked to talk about security products and how they might not do what you assume they will.

Reports like this (PDF) provide an interesting insight into how security products actually work. Marketing messages will inevitably claim world-beating levels of effectiveness, while basic tests might well support these selling points. But when you actually hack target systems through security appliances you sometimes get a very different picture.

Some vendors will support the view that testing using a full attack chain (from a malicious URL pushing an exploit, which in turn delivers a payload that finally provides us with remote access to the system) is the right way to test. Others may point out that the threats we are using don’t exactly exist in the real world of criminality because we created them in the lab and are not using them to break into systems worldwide.

We think that is a weak argument. If we can obtain access to certain popular, inexpensive tools online and create threats then these (or variants extremely close to them) are just as likely to exist in the ‘real world’ of the bad guys as in a legitimate, independent test lab. Not only that, but we don’t keep creating new threats until we break in, which is what the criminals (and penetration testers) do. We create a set and, without bias, expose all of the tested products to these threats.

But in some ways we have evolved from being anti-malware testers to being penetration testers, because we don’t just scan malware, execute scripts or visit URLs. Once we gain access to a target we perform the same tasks as a criminal would do: escalating privileges, stealing password hashes and installing keyloggers. The only difference between us and the bad guys is that we’re hacking our own systems and helping the security vendors plug the gaps.

Latest report (PDF) now online.

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SE Labs Ltd is a private, independently-owned and run testing company that assesses security products and services. The main laboratory is located in Wimbledon, South London. It has excellent local and international travel connections. The lab is open for prearranged client visits.

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