Special Edition is the blog for security testing business SE Labs. It explains how we test security products, reports on the internet threats we find and provides security tips for businesses, other organisations and home users.

Friday, 14 October 2016

Interview With The Bank Manager

Pundits pontificating about online fraud is all well and good, but what do the banks think, and how do they protect us? 

To find the truth, we talked candidly to a branch manager from UK bank NatWest.


SE: First of all, what's the scale of the online fraud problem from the bank's perspective?


I won’t lie. It's massive. We're always being told about phishing emails, and you can report them to us online. Scam phone calls pretending to be the bank and asking for your account details and passwords are also huge. Just to be sure, we never ask for passwords. No one does Well, no one legitimate anyway.




SE: If you're scammed can you get your money back?

  
It all depends. The basic thing is if it's not a transaction you've made, its fraud and we can help. If it's something you've done yourself that's it, the money's gone. Where it gets tricky is when you think you're signing up to a one-off payment but the small print says it's every month and you don't realise. It might be cleverly worded, but it's up to you to read what it is you're buying.  If there's any doubt, don't do it or bring it in for us to check.


SE: How do you protect people's money in general? 

The monitoring systems now are really good. They put blocks on cards when something suspicious happens, and block dodgy transactions while we find out if they're legitimate. Tell us you're going to France for the week and we'll know not to block your cards if we see a cash withdrawal from Paris. If you tell us you usually go to France about now then we can keep the card active for you. It's just when we see things out of the ordinary that the system will react. A lot of the time people get their cards blocked on holiday because they forgot to tell us. It's a pain for them, but if you tell us what you're doing it's usually fine.



We see a lot of "Make $2000 a month from home"-style spam. What's the scam there?


It's usually money laundering. A foreign gang wants your bank details to put money into your account, then you send it on to someone either at home or abroad but keep an agreed percentage as commission. It's an old one, that. Sometimes, they want you to physically receive and send on stolen bank cards as well, or ones that have been obtained fraudulently. But you're being used. Basically, if you're caught acting as a money mule, then you're as guilty as the bloke who gave you the money to carry. We have a legal obligation to report anything over a certain amount transferred from abroad into people's accounts. Again, it's one of the things the system looks for that's out of the ordinary.



Can the banks stop people being duped into sending money to scammers abroad?


You mean like rich Nigerian princes and lottery wins that need a processing fee? At the end of the day, it's their money. We can only advise. We can say: look, we think this looks like a scam. But if they want to send it abroad then we have to do it for them. If it's a large amount, we'll ask them in to sit down and think is this really what they want. [We try to] find out how well they understand what they're doing and where they're sending it. We have had cases where people have lost considerable amounts because they're convinced it's real.



What's the most outrageous thing you've seen?


I was asked to look at the cash machine outside the branch I was managing once, and there was a piece of wire hanging out of the card slot. That's all it was. But it prevented the card from being returned, so people walk off thinking the machine's swallowed it. You pull on the wire and the card pops out. It's called a Lebanese Loop.  Simple and easy. Once you've got the card you've got the expiry date and the CVV number on the back and you can go shopping.



What's your personal message to customers?


Basically, it’s always a scam. If it looks like something where you think you can get one over on the sender, it's still a scam. These people aren't stupid. No one wants to give you free money. You haven't won a foreign lottery, either. There's no pot of gold. They may only want a small processing fee, but if they get a lot of fees, it's very profitable for them. Start with the idea that everything's a scam, ask us to confirm anything you get that you don't understand and you'll be alright.



What other guidance is there for people?


There's lots about but it's a bit scattered. Barclays did a good TV advert about phone scams. We've published a really comprehensive leaflet about online scams in conjunction with the police that covers all the different frauds. You can download that, and we have a web site for reporting scams. But if you have any questions the best thing is to just call the bank or walk into a branch and ask. That's the best thing.

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