Special Edition is the blog for security testing business SE Labs. It explains how we test security products, reports on the internet threats we find and provides security tips for businesses, other organisations and home users.

Friday, 30 September 2016

A Very Sophisticated Hack...

If you search for the phrase "very sophisticated hack" and do a little digging, you'll soon discover that what are initially claimed to be diabolical plots by fiendish cybercriminals often turn out to be nothing more than incompetence or naivety on the part of the victims. They only appear sophisticated to the average Joe.

Banks, casinos, hospitals, health insurers, dating sites, even telecoms providers have all fallen in the past year. Digging reveals SQL injections (I'm looking at you, TalkTalk) to second hand switches with no firewalls protecting the SWIFT network in Bangladesh.
 

While these issues are bread and butter to security testing and code review companies, there is one piece of the IT security puzzle that can never be truly secured, no matter how hard you try. It weighs about 1.3Kg (about 3lbs in old money) and it sits in front of every endpoint, every BYOD, every spam email, everything, wondering whether to click that link, install that program, insert the flash drive it found, or type in its credentials.


It's been said that your brain starts working the moment you wake, and doesn't stop until you get to work. Many incidents reported as "sophisticated" confirm this truism, along with the one about not being able to make anything idiot proof because idiots are so ingenious. Fooling someone into doing or telling you something they shouldn't is the oldest hack in the book, but it's no less potent for its age. For that reason, the unwitting symbiosis of naive user and cybercriminal is virtually unbeatable.

Part of my work involves maintaining the company spam honeypot network. By the time you've seen your 100th identical, badly-spelt phishing email whizz by in the logs, you can't believe anyone would fall for them. But they do, especially spear phishing attacks. There's a ransomware epidemic, and it's making millions a day.

I'm left concluding that people don't approach their inboxes with a high enough degree of

cynicism. Would HR really summon you to a disciplinary meeting by sending you an email demanding you click a link to an external web site and enter your corporate username and password to prove it's you?

Like suspiciously quiet toddlers, the human element will always be the unpredictable elephant in the cybersecurity room. At SE Labs, we test the endpoint protection that keeps users safe from themselves. To do so, we use fresh threats caught painstakingly in the wild on a daily basis. We can always help build better protection, but cybercriminals will always strive to make better toddlers out of users.

But users are not toddlers; they're responsible, busy adults. To them, cybersecurity is just a very dull art practised by dull people in IT, and their equally friends who come in with laptops every so often to check everything.

This point leads me to one final truism: get them laughing, get them learning. All the user security training in the world will fail to change behaviours if it's dull. People best remember what they enjoy. Make cyber security fun for users, and you may just get them to apply a healthy dose of cynicism to their inboxes.


1 comment:

  1. Good article Jon. I work for a large IT outsourcing company (no names) and I cannot believe how many of my co-workers do not bother to check the origin of an email. Even worse, they do not check the email address or URL for any link they are requested to click. They never challenge why someone, pretending to be a large corporation, or a government agency would be using a Gmail or Yahoo account rather than their corporate email system or corporate domains.

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